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Combination prevention programmes are effective. However, to have long-term and sustained impact on reducing new HIV infections, they must be tailored to the local context and work at the levels of the person, family, community and society. These, according to UNAIDS, are rights-based, evidence-informed and community-owned programmes that use a mix of biomedical, behavioural and structural interventions. There has been an increase in the choice of biomedical prevention options, including condoms, voluntary medical male circumcision and ARV-based prevention. Still, available services are not meeting the actual need, and many challenges remain in achieving the prevention targets. How can different stakeholders work together to ensure that HIV prevention needs of all citizens are taken into account and provided for? What do national governments need to do to meet and sustain the prevention targets? And what should civil society do to make this happen?

11:00
Welcome and introduction (including first round of voting)
Shaun Mellors, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, United Kingdom
11:05
The personal (people-centred) perspective
Amaranta G Gómez Regalado, The International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA), Mexico
11:10
The structural barriers/factors perspective
11:15
The biomedical prevention perspective
Giovanni Ravasi, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), United States
11:20
The perspective of young people
11:25
Using ICT to empower girls and young women
Kecia Bertermann, Girl Effect, United Kingdom
11:30
Questions and discussion between panellists and audience (including second round of voting)
11:50
Questions from the moderator
Shaun Mellors, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, United Kingdom
12:05
Second round of questions and discussion between panellists and audience
12:25
Closing remarks
Shaun Mellors, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, United Kingdom